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Waldorf Astoria Interior Spaces Designated as New York City Landmarks

Waldorf Astoria Interior Spaces Designated as New York City Landmarks

Park Avenue lobby of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. Credit: Hilton Worldwide.

Less than one week after the Waldorf Astoria New York shut its doors for a multi-year renovation and partial residential conversion, the hotel received new historic protection. On Tuesday, the Preservation Commission voted to designate spaces on the ground, first, second, and third floors as interior .

Park Avenue entrance to the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. Credit: cogito ergo imago/Flickr
Park Avenue entrance to the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. Credit: cogito ergo imago/Flickr.

The hotel, not the first to bear the name, was designed by Schultze and Weaver and opened on October 1, 1931. The 625-foot-tall, 44-story Art Deco skyscraper – occupying the full city block bound by Park Avenue, East 50th Street, Lexington Avenue, and East 49th Street – was designated an individual (or exterior) landmark in 1993. However, until today, its interior spaces sat unprotected.

Clock in the main lobby of the Waldorf Astoria New York Hotel. Credit: Hilton Worldwide.
Clock in the main lobby of the Waldorf Astoria New York Hotel. Credit: Hilton Worldwide.

The ground floor spaces that are now protected include the Park Avenue vestibules and foyer and the Lexington Avenue vestibules and foyer. On the first floor, there are is the Park Avenue Lobby and colonnade, the West Lounge (the former Peacock Alley), the West Elevator Lobby, the Main Lobby, the Main Lobby Hall, the East Arcade, and the Lexington Avenue stairs and landing.

Grand ballroom at the Waldorf Astoria New York hotel. Credit: Hilton Worldwide.
Grand ballroom at the Waldorf Astoria New York hotel. Credit: Hilton Worldwide.