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Landmarked Rufus King Park In Queens To Get New Entrances And Other Upgrades

Landmarked Rufus King Park in Queens to Get New Entrances and Other Upgrades

Rufus King House. Credit: King Manor Museum.

Rufus King House. Credit: King Manor Museum.

Most of the big news about landmarked sites comes from Brooklyn and Manhattan. There isn’t much in Queens that makes headlines; for example, only two of the 26 sites designated from the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s 95-item backlog were in Queens County. Today, however, we have news about a landmarked park in Jamaica.

The park in question is Rufus King Park, which encircles the Rufus King House, an individual and interior landmark at 150-05 Jamaica Avenue. The house’s construction dates to 1730, with an addition built in about 1806. The house and grounds were acquired by the Village of Jamaica in 1897 and then fell under the jurisdiction of the new unified city Parks Department the following year. It has been a public park ever since.

Rufus King was an abolitionist born in 1755. He represented New York in the U.S. Senate from 1813 to 1825 and twice served as Minister to Great Britain. He died in Jamaica in 1827.

Rufus King Park in 1933.

Rufus King Park in 1933.

Individual designation, including the full area bound by Jamaica Avenue, 150th Street, 89th Avenue and 153rd Street, took place in 1966. Interior designation for the house took place in 1976. The house is now known as the King Manor Museum and is open five days a week.

The Parks Department wants to make changes to the park’s paths, which have changed over the decades. Two new entrances will be added, one along 150th Street about halfway between Jamaica and 90th avenues and the other at the corner of Jamaica Avenue and 153rd Street.